Jobs in Private Schools

This section focuses on tools, tips and articles related to working in a private school. We’ll cover marketing yourself, resume tips and contract negotiations. Learn more about the availability of private school jobs, the difference between a cover letter and letter of interest, and what impact you can have as a teacher.
View the most popular articles in Jobs in Private Schools:
This guide is designed to provide teachers and administrators seeking employment in private schools a road map for the job search process. It is written for teachers as well as admissions and business office professionals and those seeking positions as dean of students and head of school.You will find plenty of practical advice about applying, networking, using job boards and much more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's a tough job market out there. The economy has forced schools public and private on every level to cut their teaching staffs. As a result, when you begin to look for a job as a teacher or administrator in a private school, you will face serious competition from other private school teachers, public teachers, business people and even graduate students who cannot find a college teaching job. Observe these Do's and Don'ts to keep yourself ahead of the competition and land the private school job of your dreams.

DO: Use your network.
Arguably the best way to find a job in a private school is by using your network. These are friends and colleagues who know you, indeed have known you for years, and can talk enthusiatically about you and your skills as a teacher or administrator. Networking is all about meeting people and staying in touch with them. How do you do that? Use all the social and professional networking tools out there. They cost little but reap huge rewards. Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and blogs allow you to exchange ideas and comments as well as see what's going on. Professional sites like Independent School Educators Network and ISED-L give you an opportunity to become known in the private school community.

DON'T: Use weak references.
When you submit your job application, you will be asked to include 3-5 references. These people will be called if you make the short list. You must . . .read more
It's tough enough getting an interview in the first place. So, why destroy your chances by turning up in the wrong attire? Why is the way you look important? The first impression an interviewer has of you is a lasting one. Indeed, many hiring decisions are made subconsciously as soon as the interviewer looks at you.

Dress to the Level of the Job Environment
Teachers are exemplars to the young people they teach. The way you dress sets an example just as your speech patterns do. That being said, it makes a great deal of sense to dress conservatively when you interview for a teaching position.

Men

What Works
The standard classic prep look is always acceptable in private school circles. A blue or white oxford cloth button-down shirt paired with an old school tie or rep pattern is understated and elegant. Add khaki or grey slacks to that together with black socks and a slip-on loafer style shoe and you are all set. If you wear bowties, then do so. Not the big floppy kind, but instead a conservative one in a rep pattern will make the right statement. A blue blazer is appropriate in cooler parts of the country. As a rule you should wear your jacket and only remove it if invited to do so. Your hair should be neat and trimmed.

Now, if at this point you are complaining that you will look like the headmaster, that's the point. You want . . .read more
As the United States faces unprecedented challenges both at home and abroad, the need for schools to have teachers with a 21st century viewpoint and a 21st century skillset has never been more obvious. Dynamic, visionary teachers are needed to shape new generations of citizens who will have the ideas and abilities to lead and guide our country. If this sounds radical, it really isn't. It is the same principle and thinking which caused the Phillips family of Exeter and Andover fame to found those schools. Those school founders knew that the infant nation needed well-schooled, well-trained people to lead it in the years ahead. They believed in this country and the concept of universal education so deeply that they put their money where their mouth was and created schools which still, to this day in the 21st century, reflect extraordinary dynamism and vision. With that thesis as our backdrop let's look at what is needed to be a 21st century teacher.

Viewpoint
A 21st century viewpoint includes teachers right across the K-12 spectrum. While things technological are not critical in the formative, early years, empowering children to discover and to learn most certainly is. Here are some things the 21st century primary grade teachers need to do.

 

  • Teach children that they are part of a global community.
  • Teach children to appreciate diversity in all its aspects.
  • Teach children to be tolerant.
  • Teach children to be aware of the many societies and civilizations which came before them.
  • Teach children . . .read more
Many teachers don't realize that conversations, activities and photographs which they considered personal and private are out there for anybody to see. If you have a Facebook page and Twitter, you have to understand that you are leaving all kinds of electronic evidence for potential employers, or anybody, for that matter, to see. Why does this matter? It matters because you never know how a future or current employer might interpret some of the things he sees on your Facebook page. Those candid photos of you and your friends enjoying a post-exam beer bash might be difficult to explain when you apply to St. Andrew's Methodist School. If you already have a position in a private school, you can be virtually guaranteed that your students will be searching the internet with a fine toothed comb looking for something - anything - about you. Make sure that whatever they find is squeaky clean and beyond reproach. If it isn't, the headmaster and trustees will learn about it faster than you can say "You're fired!"

Twitter is the hottest instant communications tool we have seen in a long time. It's great for zapping comments back and forth with your friends. But what if you make some frank comment about what a pain your dean is or how fat the athletic director is? How do you know that your comments aren't being retweeted to somebody else who knows your dean or that rotund AD? Next thing you know you are . . .read more
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Jobs in Private Schools

Basics

Here you'll find valuable information on finding jobs within the private school sector. Get the basics on everything from job searches to salary and contract negotiations. Explore the dos and don’ts of private school employment and learn your marketability quotient.

Applying and Interviewing

Learn more about applying and interviewing for jobs in a private school. Here we'll cover everything from cover letters to interview questions. Get tips on common application mistakes, how to ask good questions during your interview, and marketing yourself.

Teaching

A glimpse into some of the most important facing teachers today. Learn why it's important to be cautious on Facebook. Get tips on switching to a teaching career later in life. And learn how a teacher can influence students and their families.