Jobs in Private Schools

This section focuses on tools, tips and articles related to working in a private school. We’ll cover marketing yourself, resume tips and contract negotiations. Learn more about the availability of private school jobs, the difference between a cover letter and letter of interest, and what impact you can have as a teacher.
View the most popular articles in Jobs in Private Schools:
If you have 3 or more of the following skills or credentials, you will position yourself for greater success in the private school employment market. While there is a shortage of qualified teachers, it is still a highly competitive arena in the private school world. Consequently your chances at finding your dream job will improve if you can offer one or more of the following:


1. Speak and teach a second language.
Teachers who speak French, Spanish and Mandarin are much in demand in any school. Add a degree and certifications in those subjects to your credentials and you will be a 'hot'  property! Unlike public schools where language skills are necessary just to deal with a non-English speaking population, private schools offer academic courses in French, Spanish
and Mandarin language and literature. Many of these courses lead to AP level examinations. You will have the opportunity to use that honors degree work in foreign languages to your advantage.

2. Hold specialist certifications.
An ESL certificate or a reading specialist certificate will virtually guarantee you employment for life at many schools. Schools which enrol non-English speaking students frequently require those students to master English at a very high level in order to complete their academic course work with good grades. An ESL certified teacher is an integral part of the teaching strategy and an important element in a diverse community. A reading specialist can effectively remediate reading and comprehension skills allowing the language arts teachers to focus...
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What is Praxis?
Most states require public school teachers to be licensed. Part of the licensing process is taking and passing Praxis I and/or Praxis II. Praxis I tests your competence in Reading, Writing and Mathematics. Many education programs will accept Paxis I scores in place of SAT or ACT scores. They basically test the same kind of readiness for tertiary level academic work.
 
Praxis II consists of subject or content tests. These are offered in standard subject areas such as Spanish, physics, language arts and so on. If you seek to be licensed as a physics teacher, for example, you would pass the Praxis II exam in physics as part of that requirement.
 
Where Do You Take the Tests?
Most people take the computer-delivered tests. These are held at testing centers in your local area. The Praxis site has a convenient test center locator. You register for the test at a time of your choosing online. You pay the fees online. The fee scale ranges from $50 to $139 depending on how you bundle the various tests.
 
Praxis and Private School Teacher Certifications
While private schools are not required to employ licensed teachers, they do value those credentials. Licensing establishes a teacher's adherence to a standard of teaching practice, just as a degree in your subject establishes your knowledge and understanding of that subject. Put another way, a teaching license on its own proves that you have met certain minimum standards in the art and skill of teaching. You wouldn't have an angioplasty done...
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Those of us who have interviewed hundreds of job applicants over the years know the traps an interview contains. Here are some tips to avoid those traps when you interview for that job as the math teacher at St. Agatha's Academy.

 

1. Do some role playing.
A few weeks before your interview do some role playing. Enlist the aid of a trusted friend or family member to play the part of the interviewer. Dress in your 'interview outfit'. Do the role playing in a setting similar to what you might expect for the interview, such as an office or a table in Starbucks. The old adage 'practice makes perfect' applies. You will be amazed at the imperfections and glitches which a little role playing will smoke out.

 

 

2. Prepare a clear, concise resume.
A poorly prepared resume can confuse and mislead the interviewer. Again, enlist the eyes and opinion of a trusted friend to review your resume for clarity and conciseness. Think of your resume as a mirror on you. Make sure it reflects a superb image. Always print a resume in a standard business font such as Arial using black ink on white paper. Make sure there are no typos.

 

3. Dress for success.

 

You will never go wrong dressing semi-formally. For men that means a jacket, slacks and tie. For women a pants suit or jacket and skirt are appropriate. If you have piercings and tatooes you might want to remove the metal and cover the artwork. Once again have...
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Hundreds of private schools, and for that matter, public schools, outside the United States will be happy to have you as a teacher for a few years. It's a great opportunity for teachers of any age who want to experience the world. And, because they need trained teachers, the local authorities will take care of all the immigration matters for you as part of the contract.
 
At the end of this article you will find links which will help you find jobs overseas. But before you explore those, what's it really like teaching abroad?

1. You won't get rich.
You knew that anyway. But be prepared for the reality that teachers don't make a lot of money overseas. Depending on the job location, you may get housing included. Most likely you will have to find housing yourself. You definitely will not have a lot of money for luxuries. Just the bare necessities. If you are not frugal or don't want to learn how to be frugal, you need to confront that issue before you sign up. Otherwise you will be miserable.

2. Be open minded.
Bulgaria is not the United States. and that, frankly, is part of its charm. You won't find the foods which you are accustomed to. They do things differently over there. That's the point. Try new things. Experiment. It's an adventure.

3. Third world countries do not have first world amenities.
The electricity may not be reliable. Cellphone service is usually fairly good...
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You won't find gay teachers in most religious schools where homosexuality is not tolerated. But you will find gay teachers and gay couples on staff at many top prep schools.

What's going on here? Aren't those schools sending the wrong message to their students? Not if the school takes the view that sexual preferences and one's life style are a strictly personal matter. As long as a teacher or staff member is qualified and competent, what does his sexuality matter.

We live in a far different world than was the case a generation or two ago. The old customs and mores have forever changed. To be sure being gay generates controversy and division in communities. Look at the serious schism which has occurred in the Anglican Church as a result of the ordination of an openly gay bishop.

Nonetheless, it takes courage for a board of trustees to employ openly gay staff. That's exactly what Phillips Andover did in 2000. The only catch is that the staff must sign an affidavit confirming that their relationship is a committed one. The lesson and example being taught here is profound: that a committed relationship deserves respect and should be upheld. Students who are seeking answers about their own sexuality will feel more inclined to discuss such serious matters without fear of retribution or derision. If a school is to truly champion diversity, then allowing faculty to live on campus in committed relationships is just one more aspect in teaching...
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Jobs in Private Schools

Basics

Here you'll find valuable information on finding jobs within the private school sector. Get the basics on everything from job searches to salary and contract negotiations. Explore the dos and don’ts of private school employment and learn your marketability quotient.

Applying and Interviewing

Learn more about applying and interviewing for jobs in a private school. Here we'll cover everything from cover letters to interview questions. Get tips on common application mistakes, how to ask good questions during your interview, and marketing yourself.

Teaching

A glimpse into some of the most important facing teachers today. Learn why it's important to be cautious on Facebook. Get tips on switching to a teaching career later in life. And learn how a teacher can influence students and their families.