Jobs in Private Schools | PrivateSchoolReview.com

This section focuses on tools, tips and articles related to working in a private school. We’ll cover marketing yourself, resume tips and contract negotiations. Learn more about the availability of private school jobs, the difference between a cover letter and letter of interest, and what impact you can have as a teacher.
View the most popular articles in Jobs in Private Schools:
Private school teachers do not belong to a teachers' union. One of the great strengths of a union is that it connects like-minded workers, keeps them informed of trends within their industry and promotes solidarity. These are all laudable aims. How does a private school teacher achieve all that?
 

Keep your network current
Think of all the people you meet in person or electronically every day. Keep email addresses for those colleagues and others whom you consider valuable in some way. Perhaps you admire a colleague for her leadership in a particular area such as laptop computing  or Web 2.0. Leave a comment on her blog. Email her. You don't have to write an epistle. A few words of positive support and encouragement are all that is needed. Ask for help. It is impossible for anybody to have all the answers. Your colleagues are a wonderful resource. Keeping your network current allows you to utilize those resources fully.

Connect on ISED-L and ISEN
Interacting with your colleagues is something you need to do regularly. Join the discussions on ISED-L and ISEN. Express your opinions. Learn from what others are saying.

 

Blog
Blogging is one of the most effective ways for you to stay connected. Blogging is free. It's easy to do. Think of blogging as an electronic journal. Jot down your thoughts. No need to fuss about syntax or grammar. Blogging is free-form. Read other blogs. Leave comments for those bloggers. Create your own blog in a private school community . . .read more
This article is written for the benefit of the hundreds of foreign nationals who seek employment in American private schools each year. Be aware that most American private schools will hire a foreign national only if he or she has a Green Card. The Green Card or Permanent Resident Card (also known as Form I-551) gives its holder permission to work in the U.S. Without it or American citizenship you cannot work in the U.S. So the answer to the question "Can foreign nationals get teaching jobs in U.S. private schools?" is "No!" with only a few minor exceptions.
 
Why won't a school sponsor your application for a Green Card? Because it is too much of gamble. The school goes through all the hassle and expense of securing a Green Card for you only to have you decide a few years later that you want to work in another school. It's just not worth it.

A few private schools will go to the bother of securing a Permanent Resident Card for a key staff member such as a head of school. But those instances are few and far between. The situation is very much a 'catch 22' as the American Embassy in your home country will tell you that you need a job before you can apply for a work visa. On the other hand the school will tell you that it needs you to have a green card before it will consider you for employment.
 
The very few exceptions . . .read more
Each state sets its own teacher certification requirements. While many private schools do not require you to be certified, it is in your best interests to obtain certification.  Why is that so? Simply because it adds one more important credential to your resume. That will help keep you marketable for many years to come.
 
Here is the contact information you need to find out what the specific requirements are in the various states and territories.
  
Alabama Maine Pennsylvania
Alaska Massachusetts Rhode Island
Arizona Michigan South Carolina
Arkansas Minnesota South Dakota
California Mississippi Texas
Colorado Missouri United States DOD Schools
Connecticut Montana Utah
Delaware Nebraska Vermont
District of Columbia Nevada Virginia
Georgia New Hampshire Washington
Hawaii New Jersey West Virginia
Illinois New Mexico Wisconsin
Indiana New York Wyoming
Iowa North Dakota  
Kansas Ohio  
Kentucky Oklahoma  
Louisiana Oregon

 

Children learn not only the lessons which we try to teach them, but also lessons which by their very nature are perhaps more subtle. These are the lessons which children learn by osmosis or example. The following is pure fiction, but it makes one wonder if things might have been a bit different if some of these teachers had tried a different approach.
 
40 a.d.

Setting: High on one of the seven hills of Rome


Aurelius Flagellus Horribilis looked up from his table. The three discipuli in his charge were supposed to be working on their times tables. "What is taking them so long?" Flagellus muttered to himself, and got up to inspect their work more closely. As he came up behind Lucius Domitius Nero, a skinny thirteen year old with greasy hair in a retro Caesar cut and pocked skin,  he was horrified to see that Nero was not writing at all. Rather he had broken his stylus and was trying to use his index finger to mark out the answer for  IX times V. Sighing aloud, Flagellus handed Nero a new stylus and smacked him across the side of the head as he did . The boy winced and hurried to complete the assigned work.  In a mocking voice Flagellus admonished the teenager, "Stop fiddling around so much!"

1700

Setting: The Thuringian town of Luneberg, Germany


Fifteen year old Johann Sebastian  Bach loved his new school. He and his friend Georg Erdmann . . .read more
Many people enjoy successful careers only to come to the realization that something is missing. That 'something' is often supplied by a desire to teach. Can you become a teacher later in life? The answer is a qualified 'Yes!'  What is involved? You need to make sure that  your credentials are in order. A master's degree in your subject will always get your resume noticed. A teaching certificate and/or education courses will strongly support your application.

Questions You Need To Ask Yourself
  

Are you a digital dinosaur?
If you have not interwoven technology into your life, then look at some profession other than teaching. Private schools have been in the vanguard of technology use in the classroom since the mid 1990's. Being a digital dinosaur will simply not cut it these days.

Have you stopped learning?
If you have, then find something else to do. Teaching is all about being a life-long learner. After all, that is what you are encouraging your young charges to be, isn't it? Your intellectual curiosity must never die. It is the hallmark of a good teacher.

Do you bristle at change?
You need to look elsewhere if you cannot stand change. Teaching is not a static profession. True, some things stay the same. A teacher will always stimulate, inspire, guide and direct. But what you teach and the way you teach is dynamic. The methodologies and presentation are changing constantly to adapt to new circumstances.

Is your network up to . . .read more
View Pages:<<Prev  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9  Next>>
Recent Articles
7 Ways to Improve Your Math Scores
7 Ways to Improve Your Math Scores
Add things up and you'll quickly find the answer- math is crucial both in academics and the real world. By following these strategies and following personal training programs, students can uncover their weaknesses and conquer math.
Why Did You Select That School?
"Because I heard it is a good school." That may well be, but there are some other factors in the private school selection process we need to consider.
Elements of a Successful YouTube Channel
Running a small to medium sized private school? Can't afford marketing staff and expensive marketing programs? Read on.
Jobs in Private Schools

Basics

Here you'll find valuable information on finding jobs within the private school sector. Get the basics on everything from job searches to salary and contract negotiations. Explore the dos and don’ts of private school employment and learn your marketability quotient.

Applying and Interviewing

Learn more about applying and interviewing for jobs in a private school. Here we'll cover everything from cover letters to interview questions. Get tips on common application mistakes, how to ask good questions during your interview, and marketing yourself.

Teaching

A glimpse into some of the most important facing teachers today. Learn why it's important to be cautious on Facebook. Get tips on switching to a teaching career later in life. And learn how a teacher can influence students and their families.