Jobs in Private Schools

This section focuses on tools, tips and articles related to working in a private school. We’ll cover marketing yourself, resume tips and contract negotiations. Learn more about the availability of private school jobs, the difference between a cover letter and letter of interest, and what impact you can have as a teacher.
View the most popular articles in Jobs in Private Schools:
Updated June 10, 2016 |
Gay Teachers
Several prep schools have pushed the envelope of diversity by allowing committed same sex couples to live on campus in school housing.
You won't find gay teachers in most religious schools where homosexuality is not tolerated. But you will find gay teachers and gay couples on staff at many top prep schools.

What's going on here? Aren't those schools sending the wrong message to their students? Not if the school takes the view that sexual preferences and one's life style are a strictly personal matter. As long as a teacher or staff member is qualified and competent, what does his sexuality matter.

We live in a far different world than was the case a generation or two ago. The old customs and mores have forever changed. To be sure being gay generates controversy and division in communities. Look at the serious schism which has occurred in the Anglican Church as a result of the ordination of an openly gay bishop.

Nonetheless, it takes courage for a board of trustees to employ openly gay staff. That's exactly what Phillips Andover did in 2000. The only catch is that the staff must sign an affidavit confirming that their relationship is a committed one. The lesson and example being taught here is profound: that a committed relationship deserves respect and should be upheld. Students who are seeking answers about their own sexuality will feel more inclined to discuss such serious matters without fear of retribution or derision. If a school is to truly champion diversity, then allowing faculty to live on campus in committed relationships is just one more aspect in teaching
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Updated June 10, 2016 |
Is Your Network Keeping You Connected?
A private school teacher has to create her own ways of staying connected. Staying connected keeps you informed and gives you a sense of solidarity.
Private school teachers do not belong to a teachers' union. One of the great strengths of a union is that it connects like-minded workers, keeps them informed of trends within their industry and promotes solidarity. These are all laudable aims. How does a private school teacher achieve all that?
 
Keep your network current
Think of all the people you meet in person or electronically every day. Keep email addresses for those colleagues and others whom you consider valuable in some way. Perhaps you admire a colleague for her leadership in a particular area such as laptop computing  or Web 2.0. Leave a comment on her blog. Email her. You don't have to write an epistle. A few words of positive support and encouragement are all that is needed. Ask for help. It is impossible for anybody to have all the answers. Your colleagues are a wonderful resource. Keeping your network current allows you to utilize those resources fully.

Connect on ISED-L and ISEN
Interacting with your colleagues is something you need to do regularly. Join the discussions on ISED-L and ISEN. Express your opinions. Learn from what others are saying.
 
Blog
Blogging is one of the most effective ways for you to stay connected. Blogging is free. It's easy to do. Think of blogging as an electronic journal. Jot down your thoughts. No need to fuss about syntax or grammar. Blogging is free-form. Read other blogs. Leave comments for those bloggers. Create your own blog in a private school community such
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Updated June 10, 2016 |
Employing Foreign Nationals
Can non-U.S. teachers get employment in American private schools? The answer is "No" in 99.9% of cases.
This article is written for the benefit of the hundreds of foreign nationals who seek employment in American private schools each year. Be aware that most American private schools will hire a foreign national only if he or she has a Green Card. The Green Card or Permanent Resident Card (also known as Form I-551) gives its holder permission to work in the U.S. Without it or American citizenship you cannot work in the U.S. So the answer to the question "Can foreign nationals get teaching jobs in U.S. private schools?" is "No!" with only a few minor exceptions.
 
Why won't a school sponsor your application for a Green Card? Because it is too much of gamble. The school goes through all the hassle and expense of securing a Green Card for you only to have you decide a few years later that you want to work in another school. It's just not worth it.

A few private schools will go to the bother of securing a Permanent Resident Card for a key staff member such as a head of school. But those instances are few and far between. The situation is very much a 'catch 22' as the American Embassy in your home country will tell you that you need a job before you can apply for a work visa. On the other hand the school will tell you that it needs you to have a green card before it will consider you for employment.
 
The very few exceptions
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Updated June 10, 2016 |
Do I Need to be Certified?
Each state sets its own teacher certification requirements. While many private schools do not require you to be certified, it is in your best interests to obtain certification. This article includes contact information for state education offices so you can begin the process.
Each state sets its own teacher certification requirements. While many private schools do not require you to be certified, it is in your best interests to obtain certification.  Why is that so? Simply because it adds one more important credential to your resume. That will help keep you marketable for many years to come.
 
Here is the contact information you need to find out what the specific requirements are in the various states and territories.
  
Alabama Maine Pennsylvania
Alaska Massachusetts Rhode Island
Arizona Michigan South Carolina
Arkansas Minnesota South Dakota
California Mississippi Texas
Colorado Missouri United States DOD Schools
Connecticut Montana Utah
Delaware Nebraska Vermont
District of Columbia Nevada Virginia
Georgia New Hampshire Washington
Hawaii New Jersey West Virginia
Illinois New Mexico Wisconsin
Indiana New York Wyoming
Iowa North Dakota  
Kansas Ohio  
Kentucky Oklahoma  
Louisiana Oregon
Updated June 09, 2016 |
A Teacher's Influence
Never underestimate the influence you have on your students. You may not think that you are getting through, but you are! This little bit of fiction shows the influence teachers had on some famous people.

If there is one thing which I have learned over many years of teaching, it is that our students learn by example. They learn not only the lessons which we try to teach them, but also lessons which by their very nature are perhaps more subtle and implied. These are the lessons which children often learn by osmosis or example. 

I also know that the lessons learned and the impressions made when a child is young last a life-time. This is one of the biggest responsibilities which we teachers and parents have as adults. Young minds process information quite differently than adult minds do. We have to constantly be aware of that. That doesn't mean that we have to dumb down information and concepts. It just means that we can assume nothing when it comes to how a child's mind will process the information it receives.

The following is pure fiction, of course, but it makes one wonder how things might have turned out if some of these teachers had tried a different approach. Perhaps if they had framed their arguments differently or taken the time to ensure that their students understood what was been taught, there might have been different results.

 
40 a.d.

Setting: High on one of the seven hills of Rome


Aurelius Flagellus Horribilis looked up from his table. The three discipuli in his charge were supposed to be working on their times tables. "What is taking them so long?" Flagellus muttered to himself, and got
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Jobs in Private Schools

Basics

Here you'll find valuable information on finding jobs within the private school sector. Get the basics on everything from job searches to salary and contract negotiations. Explore the dos and don’ts of private school employment and learn your marketability quotient.

Applying and Interviewing

Learn more about applying and interviewing for jobs in a private school. Here we'll cover everything from cover letters to interview questions. Get tips on common application mistakes, how to ask good questions during your interview, and marketing yourself.

Teacher

A glimpse into some of the most important facing teachers today. Learn why it's important to be cautious on Facebook. Get tips on switching to a teaching career later in life. And learn how a teacher can influence students and their families.