About Private Schools

An in depth look at private schools, including history, a comparison to public education, and a glimpse of what's being taught. Learn about the benefits of attending private school, to both students and parents. Explore private schools options when living abroad, and debunk many of the myths regarding private school education.
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An independent school receives no public funds. Tuition fees and gifts are the only source of an independent school's funding.
 
Generally its board or trustees is detached from and independent from any other organization. For example, many parochial and religious schools are subsets of a parent governing body. While they may be deemed 'private' schools, they are not independent schools per se.

A private school is a school which is funded by non-public monies. In other words no government funding or other tax-payer funds are used to sustain the school's operations. If the school is incorprated and established as a 501 (c) (3) entity, it will generally not be liable for local and state taxes. In that sense a private school is subsidized by the public treasury. For this reason many private schools consider it politic and prudent to pay property taxes, sewer taxes and other local taxes to ensure that the local services such as fire, police and emergency first responders are available when needed.

A country day school is a nice name for a private day school set on some beautiful treed acreage. That's right. It is really nothing more than a marketing term.

A parochial school is a type of private school. Generally parochial schools are attached to a church or other religious institution. That institution usually subsidizes the operations of the school as part of its ministry. A parochial school is usally governed by individuals selected by the religious institution. In the Roman
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 American private high schools generally prepare their graduates for college level academic studies. Because they are private or independent, as opposed to state schools, they can set their own curricula and the qualifications of their faculty. Consequently you will find a wide range of standards and achievement within the private school community. Fortunately for parents and other interested parties, most schools are very proud of where their graduates have been accepted. If a list is not available in the school's catalog or on its Web site, ask the admissions staff for a list of universities and colleges where their last class was accepted.
 
Accreditation

 

Find out if a school has been accredited by a recognized regional or national accrediting body. This is usually a solid indication that a school meets certain minimum standards as the accreditation process is rigorous and covers all aspects of the school’s operations, not just academics. Accreditation must be renewed, typically every five years.

 

The five accrediting organizations are:

 

 

 

Advanced Placement Courses and the International Baccalaureate
 

 

Schools which are serious about preparing their students for college level work will offer AP or Advanced Placement courses or participate in the IB or International Baccalaureate program. Schools which offer either
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The question of how to educate a child is one of the most important a parent can ask. A basic choice that many parents struggle with is that of public vs. private school. Parents do not want to take on unnecessary expenses if they will not ultimately benefit their child. After all, many public schools do an excellent job of educating students. But while it is true that public schools do not have tuition costs (and a private school can run, on average from 12,000 to 30,000 dollars a year), the benefits of a private education can still far outweigh the costs depending on the local options parents may face. Students who attend private schools can be more academically challenged, exposed to clearer value systems, given greater access to teachers, and may simply feel safer than local public school options. If you do decide to pursue private schooling for your child, start the research process early. Admission to private schools can be competitive, and finding a school that is a perfect fit for your child where he or she will be also be accepted, may take some time.  

A Higher Bar


A major advantage to private education is that your child will likely be challenged to a higher academic standard. Private schools can be more academically rigorous than public schools, and private school students may have to meet more criteria to keep up their grade point averages. According to The Condition of Education 2001, from the
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