How Admissions Works

The private school admissions process can be competitive. Explore the process, compile your profile and submit your application with help from our tips and tools. Explore the challenges of getting into private school and the most common mistakes made during the admission process.
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5 Admissions Tips for International Students
In addition to complying with all the usual admissions requirements, international students must also obtain a student visa. Here are five tips to help you navigate the admissions process.
Many students from countries outside the United States want to attend American private schools. In fact international students make up about 15% of the student population in American boarding schools according to The Association of Boarding Schools.  However, you need to be aware that not every private school is certified by the United States Immigration Service to accept foreign students. If in doubt, ask the school.
 
Pay Attention to The Deadlines
 
It is important to stay organized and on top of deadlines throughout the admissions process. If you are not an American citizen, you will need a student visa to enter and stay in the United States in order to attend the private school which accepts you. Getting a student visa takes time, typically 3-4 months -  and requires detailed documentation in support of your application.
 
Here are some points to consider:
 
1.  Complete and submit your school application.
 
The normal admissions process for each private school must be followed. Once you are accepted by the school, it will give you a Form I-20 which allows you to apply for a student visa. The Form I-20 is part of the Student  and Visitor Exchange Information System (SEVIS) which tracks information about all students coming to the United States.
 
2.  Complete and submit your visa application.
 
The student visa application and interview is a detailed process requiring you to attend an interview with a U.S. Consular official. You will have to complete many U.S. Immigration Service forms. Check with your local
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Waitlisted? What Next?
Being waitlisted is not the end of the world. More here.
You applied to several schools. But your first choice didn't accept you. Instead it waitlisted you. What exactly does this mean? And why do schools waitlist applicants? What do you do now?
 
What does waitlisting mean?
 
Schools typically offer places to more applicants than they have places for on the theory and experience that they will receive enough acceptances to fill all their seats. Calculating the actual yield from the acceptances which they have sent out is something which experienced admissions officers know how to do almost instinctively. For example, let's say the school has places for 100 students. It could send acceptance letters to 100 applicants. But what happens if only 75 of those families accept the places which have been offered? Having 25 empty seats will wreack havoc with any private school's finances.
 
 
That's where the waitlisting comes in. The admissions officers know that if they offer a certain number of applicants over the actual number of places which they have available, that they will receive the necessary yield of acceptances. For example, using our hypothetical 100 places available, the admissions office sends out 125 acceptance letters. The admissions staff know that historically they will receive 90-100 acceptances when they send out 125 acceptance letters. But what if circumstances conspire to produce the number on the low end of the yield scale? Say they only receive 90 acceptances? That's where the waitlist comes in to play. The school will send out 125 acceptances. It will
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Your Admissions Profile
The admissions process can seem confusing, even intimidating. In reality all the admissions staff want to do is to get to know you.
Many people find the admissions process to private schools intimidating, confusing, complicated and, perhaps, a tad invasive. "Why do they have to know so much about me?" is the question which keeps popping up as you peruse all those admissions materials.
 
The truth is that admission is more than test scores and a faultless transcript. The school wants to get to know you as much as possible. Who are you? What subjects do you like? What sports do you enjoy? What is your favorite pastime? Behind all those recommendations and test scores is a real person with dreams, aspirations and hopes. A private school wants to encourage you and help you be all you can be.
 
What Are They Looking for?
 
The admissions staff are not looking for geniuses or stars. If you have good math grades and  think that you might like to explore math in depth, a private school can make that happen. Maybe you want to play hockey on a really good team. Again, the right private school can make that happen. But you will not find the right school for you unless you open up and lay all your dreams and aspirations on the table. Once you do that, the admissions staff can begin to explore all the possibilities with you.
 
One of the great things about private schools is that they encourage excellence and a well-rounded person. You don't have to be afraid of what others will think if your passion is solving quadratic equations. If you are
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Applications Calendar
Keep track of all aspects of choosing a school as well as the application deadlines.

Applying to a private school is a process. It is a process with many sections and parts to it. If you are accustomed to managing projects and meeting deadlines, this is just another version of that kind of exercise. I strongly recommend that you set up up just as carefully as you set up a major 12 to 18 month project at the office. When you organize yourself this way, you can put the project on the back burner for a week or so in the first six months without losing any momentum because you have your notes and 'Must Do's' listed. You can see what has to be done at a glance.

Start the process well in advance.

Begin your private school search at least 18 months in advance of when you actually want your child to begin classes. For example, if you want your child to begin Grade 10, then you would begin your private school search process in the spring of Grade 8. That will give you summer and fall to identify and visit schools. That will also allow time for admissions testing and submitting applications. You can start earlier if you prefer, but this timetable will give you enough time to thoroughly research and visit schools without feeling rushed. You will be able to arrive at well-informed decisions about where to apply. Starting far in advance ensures that you have enough time to take care of all the details and arrangements involved with visit schools for the

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