Are You Doing It All Wrong?

Have you ever begun a project only to realize after a while that you really didn't know what you were doing? It's kind of like the guy who opens the box with 100 parts. Some assembly required. Does he read the directions? Probably only when he gets stuck.
 
When you set out to choose a private school for your child, you need a clear road-map for the process. You also need to understand that this is a major project which will consume a substantial amount of your valuable time.
 
How much time will it take?
 

* Researching schools online: 20-30 hours spread out over 4-6 weeks. This task can be done in the comfort of your own home on your own time.
 
* Visiting out of town schools: 36-60 hours spread out over 3 or 4 visits. The amount of time consumed by travel is the wild card here. The actual campus visit will usually include an interview with the admissions staff. Allow about an hour for testing. 
 
* Visiting local schools: 10-15 hours spread out over 2 or 3 visits. Interviews and any testing which the schools require will add an hour or two.
 

Signs that you may be doing it wrong
 

As you can see choosing a private school is a project. A major project. Get it wrong and you will have a very unhappy child who hates her school. It's also possible that your child won't even get into a school. So, before you get that sinking feeling that you . . .read more
Selecting schools which fit your needs and requirements takes a lot of time and effort just by itself. But once that part of the process of choosing a school is finished, you need to focus on the admissions processes for the three to five schools which you have selected. Use this admissions checklist to keep you and your child on track. There is much detail, plenty of forms to fill out and a standardized admissions test to prepare for.
 
Testing
 
I have put admissions testing at the top of my checklist simply because it needs as much advance preparation as your child can give it. While standardized admissions tests are just one of several tools which the admissions professionals at each school will use to assess your child, they are an important part of the assessment process. Most schools use the SSAT and ISEE. But there are other tests out there as well. Once you have narrowed your choice of schools to the magic three to five number, review the admissions requirements carefully. With luck you will dsicover that all the schools on your list use the same test. That will simplify matters enormously for both you and your child.
 

 
If, on the other hand, you end up with two or possibly three different tests, you will have those additional test registrations to schedule, register and pay for. Scheduling works best when you start as far in advance as you possibly can. The SSAT opens . . .read more
The other day I heard about a father who was bemoaning the fact that his nineteen year old son was a mess. The gist of this father's complaint was that he had done so much for his child but nothing seemed to be appreciated.  I totally understand the complexities and pitfalls of raising children in the 21st century. It is a scary, very different world from the one I was raised in back in the 50s and 60s, for sure. It is a much different world from the one in which we raised our four children. And, yes, there were times - not many - when I was guilty of being a velcro or helicopter parent. I couldn't bear to see my children fail or make the mistakes I made. Unfortunately, that strategy never produced the results I was expecting.
 
With all this in mind let's take a look at what happens when parents over-indulge and over-protect their children.   
 
What do the terms "velcro" and "helicopter" parents mean?
 
The term "velcro parent" describes the kind of parent who sticks close to his child to protect him. The "helicopter parent" is constantly hovering around her child to protect him. Merriam Webster's Dictionary defines a helicopter parent as "a parent who is overly involved in the life of his or her child". While there is no entry for "velcro parent", one can only assume that it will not be long before there is.
 
Velcro and helicopter parents have their children's best interests at heart. . . .read more
Ever wish you could pick the brain of A+ students?  Well, we did it for you — we spoke with dozens of students and educators to find out their secrets for success.

 

Everything they had to say is compiled here.  There’s short term techniques to get you started on your way as well as long term tips to maintain your achievements.

 

 

Happy studying!  And remember — grades aren’t everything.  Use them as a tool to measure your learning, not as a goal in and of themselves. 

 

 

1. Know your learning style.

 

 

Learning

 

 
Different study strategies work better for different people, and knowing your learning style will help you understand which study methods work best for you. Take this 20 question quiz to find out your learning style!

 

- Aaron Harris, Harvard alum and CEO of Tutorspree

 

 

2. Color code your notes.

 

 

If you write notes by hand, have a black pen, red pen, blue pen, and green pen handy. If you take notes on the computer be prepared to change the color of the text. When the teacher gets to a number or date you need to remember, write the numbers in red. If your professor throws out an important term or definition, put the term in blue. And if you need to remember places or famous names, put them in green. Everything else, keep in black.

 

 

When you study, memorize the important colored words and the “black words” will follow. Then you . . .read more
The pendulum has swung once more. This time in favor of the advantages of single sex education. New research quantifies what many of us have known anecdotally, namely that single sex education works. Here are a dozen or so boys' schools' public thoughts about themselves and their missions.

 

From Avon Old Farms, Avon, Connecticut
 
 
"As a boys' boarding school, our programs are designed specifically to help young men focus on their development at a time in life when distractions abound. Although numerous opportunities exist for our students to interact with girls from Miss Porter's, Ethel Walker's and other nearby schools, boys are free to live and learn in our structured, supportive environment. In an all-boys context, our students embrace scholastic challenges and compete in the athletic arena while feeling safe exploring the arts, experimenting with poetry, expressing school spirit, and just being themselves."

 

Avon Old Farms offers grades 9-12 as well as a Postgraduate year. The school serves approximately 500 young men.

 
From Marquette University High School, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
 

 
"MUHS has evolved with each passing decade to meet the changing needs of the young men in our community and like our 17th Century namesake, Father Jacques Marquette, students, faculty and staff members share a passion for exploring uncharted territory, whether it’s in a textbook or their own hearts."

 

Marquette University High Schools offers grades 9-12. The school serves approximately 1050 young men.
 
From Bellarmine College Preparatory, San Jose, California
 

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