Basics

Here you'll find valuable information on finding jobs within the private school sector. Get the basics on everything from job searches to salary and contract negotiations. Explore the dos and don’ts of private school employment and learn your marketability quotient.
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Looking for a Job: Easier When Employed or Unemployed?
Looking for a job in these tough economic times is a challenging process. But is it easier to do when you are employed or unemployed? It depends. Here are some answers.

If you are looking for a teaching job, then you probably understand how tough the employment situation is. Because of significant budget cuts in the public school sector, tens of thousands of qualified, experienced teachers are looking for employment. Add to that very sizable candidate pool all the newly-minted teachers graduating from our nation's 670 accredited schools of education, and you can readily see how very competitive the market is. Naturally some areas of the country are more severely impacted than others. Within those areas there will be a few school districts in a few communities which have been able to hold their own. The issue with public school funding has much to do with the fact that a substantial portion of a school district's budget comes from local property taxes. School districts in affluent communities usually will fare better than districts which have a decreasing tax base. 

While this oversupply of experienced, qualified teachers is an advantage for private schools because it increases the applicant pool, this situation does make it much more competitive for those of you who want to secure a private school teaching job. Finding employment in a private school works a bit differently from finding employment in the public sector. I suggest that you review my Job Search Resources to understand the mechanics of finding private school employment. I have covered the subject from every angle I could think of.  I also spent 17 years in the corporate environment

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Do You Need a Rebranding?
If you have been teaching for a few years, chances are that you will need to consider rebranding yourself.

I can just hear you thinking to yourself: "Why on earth would I need a rebranding?" Signs that you might need a rebranding include the reality that you are invisible to prospective employers and, almost as bad, your credentials have begun to look kind of 2000-ish. Rebranding. Makeover. Facelift. Call it whatever you wish. But it all amounts to the same thing. Or does it? Rebranding, you see, is intrinsically much more focused than a simple makeover or a facelift. Let's see what is involved.

What is rebranding?

Rebranding sounds like something Proctor and Gamble might do with a tired soap brand. The product does a great job, but it has lost the appeal it once had in the marketplace. Are you beginning to see how this might have some relevance to a private school teacher? Rebranding yourself as a dynamic teacher with vision, expertise in her subject and the skills to create excitement in the classroom will push your candidacy for the position you want to the front of the pack. Or you can leave things as they were. The choice is yours.

Remember: it is a fiercely competitive job market in the second decade of the 21st century. Schools have hundreds of highly qualified and experienced candidates from which to choose. Why should they look at you? They should look at you because the rebranded you seems fresh, relevant, and  perfect for position they have open.

Who is a candidate for rebranding?

Unless you have an iron-clad

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Your Teaching Contract Hasn't Been Renewed?
Private school teachers are not unionized. So, if the school decides not to renew your contract, you have little recourse. Here are five suggestions for safe-guarding your employment.

You thought that you were doing a good job. Your students seemed to like you. You interacted well with parents. However, everything changed when you received that dreaded letter stating that the school would not be renewing your contract for the coming academic year. Unfortunately, since private school teachers are not unionized, you have no recourse. Obviously, you need to make sure that you leave with good references if at all possible. It will do you no good to leave with negative references.

Most teachers like to teach. But many teachers don't like to market themselves. Unfortunately, that is what private school teachers have to do these days. Nobody else is going to market them. Most teachers don't belong to an agency which exposes them to schools looking to fill a vacancy. Because the job market is so very competitive, teachers have to sell themselves or risk losing out to a more competitive candidate. Here are five things which you can do to prevent that non-renewal letter from arriving in the first place.

1. Show that you love teaching young people.

I mention this in the first slot because this is why the school probably hired you in the first place. Occasionally a school will hire a displaced college professor. Why does that matter? Academia has been shedding jobs for many years as colleges realign their programs to changing market conditions. As a result, hundreds of very well-degreed graduate students are looking at all their options. Teaching in a private school beats

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Conducting a Job Search Via the Web
The Web offers job seekers all sorts of efficiencies. The same is true with respect to private school job searching.

Conducting a job search for a private school position via the Web is efficient and practical compared to the way we used to have to do it years ago. These days you can find job listings on the Web, gather information, apply for jobs, and even interview. Let's explore these options in more detail.

Find Job Listings

Without a doubt, the advantage job seekers in the 21st century have over previous generations is the Web. The Internet allows you to learn about any job opening the minute it is posted online. The same applies to niche employment such as teaching and administrative positions in private schools. At the very least, most schools will have an employment link on their sites. There may not be many listings depending on the time of the year. However, bookmark the employment links for schools in which you have an interest. Job boards and agencies provide online listings as well. Bear in mind that there are peak times in the private school job search process. Typically, November through February is the time when your colleagues are out in force there looking for jobs as well. Most private schools like to have contracts for the next academic year signed and sealed by the beginning of March. As a result, you will probably find the highest number of online listings beginning in the fall. 

Many schools find it convenient to arrange interviews before and after national and regional conferences. Keep those dates in mind. It makes sense to allocate

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Your Job Application: Making It Easy to Read
Making your job application easy to read will help your application make the first cut.
When you apply for a private school teaching or administrative position, you will be faced with many choices with respect to presentation of your personal data and information. If you are instructed to complete an online application or a downloadable application form, that resolves the issue of 'making your application easy to read'. The school will have removed all those decisions from you and the other applicants.

On the other hand, if you are faced with a free form situation with little or no guidance from the school as to what to present, then the tough choices are yours to make. The guiding principle in any free form employment application is to make the best possible impression. You can do that by making sure your employment application is clear, perfect and tailored to suit the specific position for which you are applying.

Clarity
Creating a clear, compelling resume sounds simple enough. Unfortunately most people do not craft a resume which presents them in the best possible light. The trick to writing a good resume is to write it knowing that somebody who has never met you and knows nothing about you is going to read it and make a judgement about whether to interview you or not. Second chances are unlikely. You need to get it right the first time.

Nowhere is clarity more important than in that small paragraph which most resumes caption as "Objective". This is where you state why you want the job
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BASICS