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6 Schools and Their Beginnings
This article explores the rich histories of several prestigious schools in the United States, including the Allen-Stevenson School, Lycée Français de New York, Catherine Cook School, Shattuck-St. Mary's School, and The Spence School. It explores their origins, founders, growth, philosophies, and enduring legacies, highlighting their commitment to academic excellence and progressive education principles.
iStockPhoto/Shalith

Have you ever wondered how a private school got its start? When and why was it founded? Who founded it? As I researched this article, which is a companion article to several I have written for Boarding School Review about boarding schools, I found a common thread. The founders of all these schools sought to provide a balanced, comprehensive, excellent education for their students.

Allen-Stevenson School, New York, New York

- Founded in 1883
- 200 students
- Grades K-8
- Boys
- Non-denominational
- Urban setting

The Allen-Stevenson School in New York City was founded in 1883 by Francis Bellows Allen at a home on Fifth Avenue and 57th Street. It started with only three boys enrolled in its first class. In 1885, the school moved to rented rooms at Madison Avenue and 44th Street with an enrollment of 20 boys. In 1904, Allen met Robert Alston Stevenson, a tutor, and they joined forces, moving the school to 50 East 57th Street with 100 students.[5] By 1918, enrollment exceeded 200 students. In 1924, the school purchased two brownstones and moved to its present location at 132 East 78th Street on the Upper East Side. Allen retired in 1939 at age 80 after 56 years of service, while Stevenson retired in 1947 after 43 years, with his son Robert "Huck" Alston Stevenson Jr. succeeding him as Headmaster. Over the years, the school has expanded its facilities, introduced new academic and extracurricular programs, and celebrated significant milestones like its

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Technology in the Classroom

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Technology in the Classroom
Technology is transforming K-12 education, enabling personalized learning, immersive experiences, and new teaching methods. This article explores the latest classroom technologies like interactive whiteboards, tablets, virtual reality, online learning platforms, and educational software. It examines how these tools enhance engagement, provide real-time data, and facilitate hybrid learning models.
oiStockPhoto/Gorodenkoff

I've wanted to write an article about technology and its uses in our classrooms forever. We've come a long way since PCs and VisiCalc emerged in the 1980s. Over the past 45 years, devices kept getting smaller, more powerful, and, best of all, so much easier to use. That, coupled with the explosion of information online, means that any student, any classroom, can have the resources of a Library of Congress to the Nth degree at her fingertips.

Given the scope of this subject, I will divide it into two articles. The first deals with technology in the classroom, what's used, how it's used, its pros and cons, and so forth. The second will examine the future of educational technology, its sustainability, and its use in school offices.

Technology in the Classroom

There's no doubt that technology enhances learning experiences for students. Learning Management Systems (LMS) organize and deliver those improved experiences. A Learning Management System is a software application or web-based technology used to plan, implement, and assess a specific learning process. Think of it as an electronic lesson plan book on steroids.

This video explains Learning Management Systems.

Typically, an LMS provides an instructor with a way to create and deliver content, monitor student participation, and assess student performance. It also allows students to use interactive features such as threaded discussions, video conferencing, and

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Successful Uses of AI in the Classroom

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Successful Uses of AI in the Classroom
Gain insights into striking the right balance between leveraging AI tools and preserving the irreplaceable role of human teachers.
iStockPhotos/Naphat Jorjee

AI is fast transforming the way businesses operate. So, I was curious how AI might affect our K012 classrooms. The inevitable sensational headlines, such as "Will AI replace teachers?" generate tons of speculation by the talking heads on TV and blogwriters looking for the next way to scare their readers. However, having been a teacher at both the K-12 and college levels, I can tell you that AI will not replace our teachers any time soon. With that in mind, let's look at some of the ways AI can enhance teaching and the things AI cannot do.

Successful Uses of AI in the Classroom

AI is another tool that can be used successfully by both teachers and students. I look at AI the same way I have viewed slide projectors, televisions, smartboards, computers, and all the other bits and pieces of technology that have appeared in our classrooms over the years, i.e., they help present the material I am teaching. People learn in so many different ways. Depending on the material you are presenting one of these technologies might spark that "Eureka!" moment we teachers all seek. While our student may not run into the streets as Archimedes did, she will have that look that says, "I got it!" Ultimately, it is always up to us teachers to remember that one size does not fit all. Each student learns in her way. Varied ways of presenting what you are teaching will help make the material understood.

Personalized Learning

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How to Study for an Exam

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How to Study for an Exam
Discover proven strategies for high school juniors and seniors to study effectively and excel in exams. From time management techniques to active learning strategies, this article provides essential tips for success. Get ready to boost your grades and conquer your exams with confidence!
iStockPhoto/photodjo

Exams can be nerve-wracking at any age. So, take time to show your child where exams fit in and, more importantly, how to prepare for them. Beginning at an early age, your child will encounter various methods teachers use to assess whether she has learned and understood the material being taught.

Exams are a formal, structured method of assessment. Unfortunately, what makes exams stressful in high school, college, and in our professional lives is that so much is riding on them. For example, you must pass the LSAT to get into law school. Then, you must pass a state bar exam to practice law. The pressure to succeed is enormous. That's why I recommend you tell your child how you handled preparing for and taking the exam. The more your child understands how exams work and how to handle them, the more successful she is likely to be.

Exams and tests are a great way to assess what the students have learned with regards to particular subjects. Exams will show what part of the lesson each student seems to have taken the most interest in and has remembered. Source: Edu-Quip

Understanding Your Learning Style

As soon as you can, identify your child's learning style. Observe her preferences and tendencies in how she processes and retains information. Contrast that with how you learn and what has worked for you. Sharing how you learned will help her understand how she knows. Understanding how she

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Rolling Admissions

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Rolling Admissions
Discover why many institutions opt for rolling admissions and how it can offer flexibility and opportunities for applicants throughout the year.
iStock Photo/Yuliya Pushchenko

When applying to private schools, you will find two kinds of admissions at American schools: admissions with a fixed deadline and rolling admissions. Let's look at rolling admissions and how they compare with admissions with fixed deadlines.

What is rolling admissions?

Rolling admissions refers to a school's practice of accepting applications within an admissions application window and acting on them within a couple of weeks or months, as opposed to waiting until a fixed deadline.

How does rolling admissions work?

Let's assume the rolling admissions window opens on September 1. You could submit your completed application on September 2 and expect to have a decision back from the school within a time frame from two weeks to two months. At a school with a fixed deadline for admissions, you could submit your application on September 2 but not hear whether your child had been accepted until sometime in March, assuming the fairly common January 31 deadline.

Professor Allen Grove explains the various kinds of admissions in great detail. This is a longish but in-depth video that is well worth bookmarking for later viewing.

Many schools with rolling admissions have a priority deadline. It would be wise for you to submit your application before that deadline. Once all the places are filled, applications from candidates who would otherwise have been accepted will go on a waitlist.

Which schools use rolling admissions?

Many private schools use rolling

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This article explores the rich histories of several prestigious schools in the United States, including the Allen-Stevenson School, Lycée Français de New York, Catherine Cook School, Shattuck-St. Mary's School, and The Spence School. It explores their origins, founders, growth, philosophies, and enduring legacies, highlighting their commitment to academic excellence and progressive education principles.
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