Jobs in Private Schools

This section focuses on tools, tips and articles related to working in a private school. We’ll cover marketing yourself, resume tips and contract negotiations. Learn more about the availability of private school jobs, the difference between a cover letter and letter of interest, and what impact you can have as a teacher.

View the most popular articles in Jobs in Private Schools:

5 Most Important Soft Skills to Have on Your Resume

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5 Most Important Soft Skills to Have on Your Resume
Want to be a private school teacher? Highlight your soft skills as well as technical skills in your resume.

When you apply for a teaching position, the technical and soft skills you offer are high on the list of qualifications. We'll cover technical skills in another article. But first, look at soft skills and learn why they are the backdrop against which you will be assessed both as a teacher and an individual. Your soft skills help the school determine whether you will be a good fit in the classroom and the larger school community.

The importance of soft skills

Soft skills are crucial in an interview because they are the traits that can set you apart from others with similar technical abilities. After all, you will not be the only applicant for the position you have applied for. Your soft skills can and should drive you to the top of the list. Why? Because schools want to know that a potential teacher can work well with others, communicate effectively, and adapt to new situations. Soft skills like problem-solving, teamwork, and leadership are all qualities that can make you stand out in an interview. These skills can also demonstrate your ability to handle stress, work under pressure, and think critically. In many cases, your soft skills can be just as important as your technical skills regarding hiring decisions. That's why it's always a good idea to focus on developing your soft skills alongside your technical abilities.

What are soft skills?

Soft skills are those personal attributes, habits, and social behaviors that enable you to interact with others

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What A Teacher Does

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What A Teacher Does
A teacher wears many hats. Here's a look at her duties and responsibilities.

In all the years I have written about private schools, I have never written anything about what a teacher does. This year after the pandemic, I feel that it is even more critical than ever to encourage and attract people to the profession. Let me preface my remarks by noting that teaching in a private school is somewhat different from teaching in a public school. The only exception to that statement that I can think of would be teaching in rural schools or other places where the school district is very small. Private schools are free-standing entities. There's no such thing as a district of private schools. As a result, a small PK-6 private school could have twelve teachers or less and a correspondingly tiny administrative staff. So, if small-sized schools appeal to you and prefer being in a situation where your voice can be heard, I recommend that you explore teaching in a small school. Of course, there are large PK-13 private schools with 1,000 or more students. Explore working in one of those if that's your thing.

Something which may appeal to those of you thinking about becoming a teacher later in life is that most private schools will accept your credentials without a teaching certificate. They will generally insist that you earn your teaching certification within a fixed period of a year or so. Most private schools focus on the quality of your tertiary education. So, if you did a bachelor of science

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Private School Employment: Questions And Answers

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Private School Employment: Questions And Answers
In this fictional conversation, a job seeker and I chat about looking for employment in a private school.

In this fictional conversation, a job seeker and I chat about looking for employment in a private school.

Credentials

Q. Do I need to have a teaching certificate to teach in a private school?

A. Not necessarily. It depends on the school. Some schools will employ you without a teaching certificate with the requirement that you obtain one within a stated time frame, typically a year.

Q. Do I need an education degree to teach in a private school?

A. Most private schools value degrees in a subject. For example, if you are presenting yourself as an English teacher, they will look for a bachelor's degree with a major in American or English Language and Literature. The teaching skills and methodology which you could learn if you did an education degree will be useful; however, most private schools will require you to teach in their own proprietary way. After all, that's why parents are sending their children to private school.

Q. Do I need to have a master's degree or a doctorate?

A. Your resume will stand out from the others when you offer a master's degree or terminal degree. Once again, schools understand that a highly-credentialed faculty is a powerful asset when it comes to marketing what they do. If you have started work on your master's or doctorate, be sure to indicate that on your resume. Discuss your further education plans at the interview.

Q. Will schools ask for a curriculum vitae?

A. Some will. Some

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Job Interviews: Illegal Questions

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Job Interviews: Illegal Questions
It is illegal for an interviewer to ask certain questions at your job interview. Be aware of what they can and cannot ask you.

The questions which you will encounter in your job interview for a private school teaching job depend on the experience and skill of your interviewer. Most of the time the interviewer will be well-trained and experienced. She will ask questions which are legal. However, you should be aware that even the most experienced interviews can and do slip up occasionally and ask questions which are illegal according to the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The Civil Rights Act of l964 “prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin.” Put another way, you have rights and it is very important that you know and understand them.

Read Daniel Bortz' article on Monster.com, Illegal interview questions that employers shouldn't ask you. That will give you an overview of how things work in the corporate world as well as in small business like private schools. The problem with small organizations is that they don't always have the human resources professionals on staff to remind them of legalities such as what you can and cannot ask at a job interview.

Here are some of the things which are considered illegal for the interviewer to ask about. Incidentally, both federal and state laws consider questions about these issues illegal.

  • Race, Color, or National Origin
  • Religion
  • Sex, Gender Identity, or Sexual Orientation
  • Pregnancy status
  • Disability
  • Age or Genetic Information
  • Citizenship
  • Marital Status or Number of Children

So, what do you do when an interviewer asks about any of these things? Don't answer. Depending

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Private School Job Searching 101

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Private School Job Searching 101
Here is a guide for teachers and administrators seeking employment in private schools. Think of it as a roadmap for the job search process.

Here is a guide for teachers and administrators seeking employment in private schools. Think of it as a roadmap for the job search process. I wrote this for teachers, as well as admissions and business office professionals and those seeking positions as dean of students and head of school. I have drawn most of the advice from my own experience in the field. Some of it is plain, old-fashioned common sense. I have also included some tips and strategies for dealing with today's job markets. You will find plenty of practical advice about applying, networking, using job boards, and much more. I know that your goal is to get that all-important first interview. So, with that in mind, let's get started.

Apply correctly.

You must follow each individual school's specific application instructions to the letter. If you don't follow their instructions, the staff member charged with screening applications will probably not file your application in the "To Be Interviewed" folder. Your application will end up in a folder with all the other applications which don't appear to meet their requirements at first glance. Back in the days before email and Monster.com, I had to open the mail from teachers looking for employment with the Anglican Education Association in The Bahamas. I could tell at a glance whether we would interview the applicant. Cover letters hand-written on a page torn from an exercise book never made the cut.

This video offers tips

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Recent Articles

Making Social Media Work for Your School
Making Social Media Work for Your School
An introduction to using Facebook, YouTube and Pinterest to promote your school.
SEO for Private Schools - Part 3: Using Social Media
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Social media for private K-12 schools is a bit different from social media for businesses. Some tips and strategies here.
The Pros and Cons of Teaching Overseas
The Pros and Cons of Teaching Overseas
Hundreds of private schools, and for that matter, public schools, outside the United States will be happy to have you as a teacher for a few years.

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