Elementary School

Teaching methods, admissions processes and resources relevant to private elementary schools. Learn the difference between Montessori and Waldorf approaches. Get great tips on choosing an elementary school. And find tips and resources to aid you in the admissions process.

View the most popular articles in Elementary School:

The Evolution of Early Reading Strategies for Children

Updated
|
The Evolution of Early Reading Strategies for Children
Explore the journey of early reading strategies from the 17th century to the present day, uncovering the evolution of tools, methods, and technologies that have shaped how children learn to read. This article delves into the historical milestones and contemporary approaches that offer a fascinating look at literacy development in children.

Early reading has always been a cornerstone of child development, forming the foundation of lifelong learning and comprehension. How we teach children to read has seen significant shifts over the centuries, reflecting changes in education theory, societal values, and technology. This article will explore these changes, offering insights into the past, present, and future of early reading strategies for children. To understand how we teach reading in the 21st century, let's look at how they taught reading in Roman times and the Middle Ages.

Section I: Historical Timeline of Early Reading Approaches

During Roman times

In ancient Rome, the education system was quite different from what we know today, but reading was an essential skill, especially for those belonging to higher social classes. Learning to read, writing, and arithmetic was a fundamental part of a Roman child's upbringing. Here's how children were generally taught to read during Roman times.

Roman education often began at home, especially for the elite, with either the father or a private tutor providing instruction. However, there were also rudimentary forms of schools known as "ludus litterarius," which children from a broader range of social backgrounds could attend. It was the starting point of formal education for many Roman children, focusing on reading, writing, and arithmetic. While it was rudimentary compared to modern standards, it laid the foundational skills for higher levels of Roman education.

The Romans taught reading and writing concurrently. Students learned the alphabet first. It was usually

. . .read more

When Should Your Child Repeat Kindergarten?

Updated
|
When Should Your Child Repeat Kindergarten?
This comprehensive article explores the benefits of early identification, individualized education plans, and data-driven decision-making to support children's development and successful school transition.

As parents, we face critical decisions shaping our children's educational journey. One of the challenging choices is whether to have our child repeat kindergarten or move forward despite having a birthday near the usual cut-off date. This article delves into the pros and cons of repeating kindergarten for children with cusp birthdays, aiming to assist parents in making informed decisions that best support their child's academic and emotional development.

PROS of Repeating Kindergarten for Cusp Birthday Children

Academic Readiness

Repeating kindergarten provides children additional time to develop essential pre-academic skills, ensuring they are adequately prepared for future learning. These skills may include letter recognition, basic numeracy, fine motor skills, and language development. The extra year can also foster a love for learning, setting a positive tone for the rest of their academic journey.

Emotional and Social Development

Younger children in the classroom might struggle to keep up emotionally and socially with their older peers. By repeating kindergarten, cusp birthday children can build confidence and social skills at a more appropriate pace. They can mature emotionally, enhancing their ability to navigate social interactions and adapt to the school environment effectively.

Leadership and Confidence

Being among the eldest in the class can naturally lead to opportunities for cusp birthday children to take on leadership roles. These roles can help boost their self-confidence and overall development. As they interact with younger classmates, they might act as role models and develop valuable mentoring skills.

Reducing Academic Pressure

The decision to

. . .read more

Enrichment Resources For Children Ages 10-14

Updated
|
Enrichment Resources For Children Ages 10-14
Here are some apps, YouTube Channels, and podcasts suitable for enriching the studies of students ages 10-14.

As I was doing my research for this article, I found myself thinking back to when I was 12 years old. My folks were good parents, but they didn't have the means to enrich my elementary and junior high school education. I always did my homework and practiced piano pieces, but I wanted more. That's why the Westmount Public Library became one of my favorite after-school haunts. I could explore anything and everything, and I did. That was then. Now, look at the resources my grandchildren have in a device that fits in their hands.

So, with that in mind, here are some apps, YouTube Channels, and podcasts suitable for enriching the studies of students ages 10-14. (We'll look at resources for younger and older students in another article.)

Apps

You can find most of these apps in your smartphone's store. Most are free. Take time to review and sample these apps yourself. Doing so will lead to some interesting conversations with your child. Exchanging ideas and opinions will help forge a strong relationship with your young person.

  1. Khan Academy: This app provides a wide range of free lessons on various subjects, including math, science, history, and more.
  2. Duolingo: Duolingo is a language learning app that can help students to learn a new language in a fun and engaging way.
  3. Quizlet: This app allows students to create flashcards and study sets for various subjects, including math, science, history, and more.
. . .read more

Student Health Records: Vaccinations

Updated
|
Student Health Records: Vaccinations
Most parents have questions about vaccinations. We look at the big picture and offer some sources for you to do your own research.

I grew up when polio, whooping cough, and chicken pox were the diseases parents dreaded. I remember getting shots in August before school started. That doctor's visit always seemed to be combined with visits to the shoe store for a new pair of black leather school shoes, the department store for a new pair of grey dress shorts, white shirts, and a school tie. Yes, the Westmount Public Schools had a uniform code back then.

Fast forward to the 21st century when 99% of private schools will require your children to be vaccinated. I was curious about where things stand. Here's what I discovered.

What entity requires vaccinations?

The department of health in each state publishes a list of vaccinations required by law for children. It also will list recommended immunizations. The wording will vary from state to state, of course. For example, North Carolina's K-12 School Requirements spells out the vaccinations required at each age level. It also provides details about why a particular vaccination is required and links to further information from authoritative sources such as the Centers for Disease Control.

This video reports on the vaccinations required for children attending school.

Which vaccinations are commonly needed?

The major Los Angeles healthcare organization Cedars-Sinai offers a list of immunizations needed for students ages 7 to 12.

  • 4 doses diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (DTaP, DTP, DT, Tdap or Td); 3 doses
. . .read more

How To Have Successful Parent-Teacher Conference

Updated
|
How To Have  Successful Parent-Teacher Conference
The parent-teacher conference is a wonderful opportunity to discuss your child's progress. Make the most of it by preparing yourself both emotionally and intellectually for this special, brief time with your child's teacher.

As a parent and a teacher, I have been on both sides of the parent-teacher conference. Sometimes I have wondered whether we were discussing the same child. Most of the time, parents have listened intently as I pointed out their child's strengths and weaknesses. Occasionally I have had to deal with defensive parents and parents with unreasonable expectations.

Read the excellent article entitled Tips for Parents on Parent-Teacher Conferences on the National Education Association site. Against this backdrop, here are a few suggestions to help you have a successful parent-teacher conference.

This video offers an example of a parent-teacher conference.

Show up.

You have to show up to have a successful meeting with your child's teacher. That sounds so obvious, doesn't it? I can clearly remember times when the parents with whom I wanted to meet were no shows. Perhaps there was a good reason why they missed their parent-teacher conference. However, in most of those cases, I don't recall receiving a phone call or a note explaining what happened. As soon as you receive your parent-teacher conference appointment, save it in your smartphone's calendar and Google calendar. If you cannot attend for some valid reason, text, or email your child's teacher as soon as possible. Ask to re-schedule the conference.

Arriving for the conference.

Arrive at the school at least 10 minutes early for your conference. If the conference before

. . .read more

Recent Articles

5 Clues That It Might Not Really Be Montessori School
5 Clues That It Might Not Really Be Montessori School
Of the approximately 4,000 Montessori schools in the U.S. only 1,100 schools are members of the American Montessori Society. Does this matter? What else should you look for to determine if a Montessori school is the real thing?
6 Schools and Their Beginnings
6 Schools and Their Beginnings
This article explores the rich histories of several prestigious schools in the United States, including the Allen-Stevenson School, Lycée Français de New York, Catherine Cook School, Shattuck-St. Mary's School, and The Spence School. It explores their origins, founders, growth, philosophies, and enduring legacies, highlighting their commitment to academic excellence and progressive education principles.
Technology in the Classroom
Technology in the Classroom
Technology is transforming K-12 education, enabling personalized learning, immersive experiences, and new teaching methods. This article explores the latest classroom technologies like interactive whiteboards, tablets, virtual reality, online learning platforms, and educational software. It examines how these tools enhance engagement, provide real-time data, and facilitate hybrid learning models.