Jobs in Private Schools

This section focuses on tools, tips and articles related to working in a private school. We’ll cover marketing yourself, resume tips and contract negotiations. Learn more about the availability of private school jobs, the difference between a cover letter and letter of interest, and what impact you can have as a teacher.
View the most popular articles in Jobs in Private Schools:
Updated May 26, 2016 |
Looking for a Job: Easier When Employed or Unemployed?
Looking for a job in these tough economic times is a challenging process. But is it easier to do when you are employed or unemployed? It depends. Here are some answers.

If you are looking for a teaching job, then you probably understand how tough the employment situation is. Because of significant budget cuts in the public school sector, tens of thousands of qualified, experienced teachers are looking for employment. Add to that very sizable candidate pool all the newly-minted teachers graduating from our nation's 670 accredited schools of education, and you can readily see how very competitive the market is. Naturally some areas of the country are more severely impacted than others. Within those areas there will be a few school districts in a few communities which have been able to hold their own. The issue with public school funding has much to do with the fact that a substantial portion of a school district's budget comes from local property taxes. School districts in affluent communities usually will fare better than districts which have a decreasing tax base. 

While this oversupply of experienced, qualified teachers is an advantage for private schools because it increases the applicant pool, this situation does make it much more competitive for those of you who want to secure a private school teaching job. Finding employment in a private school works a bit differently from finding employment in the public sector. I suggest that you review my Job Search Resources to understand the mechanics of finding private school employment. I have covered the subject from every angle I could think of.  I also spent 17 years in the corporate environment

. . .read more
Updated August 24, 2017 |
Be Careful What You Post in Facebook!
Teachers need to learn how to be Facebook savvy. Otherwise Facebook will cause them lots of problems.

I wrote this article and its companion Leave No Evidence! because I have long been concerned that my colleagues in the classroom are not as street smart with social media as they need to be. I am focusing on the use of Facebook here. However, much of what I have to say applies to the other social media apps such as Instagram and Twitter.

When you use social media, be aware of the following:

  • Your posts are forever.
  • Your posts can be forwarded outside your circle of friends.
  • Your comments can be forwarded outside your circle of friends.
  • Your following of people and groups is visible.

Your posts are forever.

As part of my research for this article, I googled "teacher fired for posting on Facebook" and got 2,602,000 search results. Well, not all of those search results are relevant, but you get my point.  My warning is simple and very clear: if you are employed by a school or would like to be, do not post anything on Facebook which could be misinterpreted by your present or future employer. The issue is not freedom of speech. The issue is electronic media. It is everlasting.

Now, let me be more specific about what to post and what not to post. Birthday and anniversary greetings are appropriate. Nasty, intolerant comments are not appropriate. News about family gatherings and activities are appropriate.  Photos of a family gathering or your 3-month-old eating carrots are appropriate. Ranting about how much you hate

. . .read more
Updated April 07, 2016 |
Do You Need a Rebranding?
If you have been teaching for a few years, chances are that you will need to consider rebranding yourself.

I can just hear you thinking to yourself: "Why on earth would I need a rebranding?" Signs that you might need a rebranding include the reality that you are invisible to prospective employers and, almost as bad, your credentials have begun to look kind of 2000-ish. Rebranding. Makeover. Facelift. Call it whatever you wish. But it all amounts to the same thing. Or does it? Rebranding, you see, is intrinsically much more focused than a simple makeover or a facelift. Let's see what is involved.

What is rebranding?

Rebranding sounds like something Proctor and Gamble might do with a tired soap brand. The product does a great job, but it has lost the appeal it once had in the marketplace. Are you beginning to see how this might have some relevance to a private school teacher? Rebranding yourself as a dynamic teacher with vision, expertise in her subject and the skills to create excitement in the classroom will push your candidacy for the position you want to the front of the pack. Or you can leave things as they were. The choice is yours.

Remember: it is a fiercely competitive job market in the second decade of the 21st century. Schools have hundreds of highly qualified and experienced candidates from which to choose. Why should they look at you? They should look at you because the rebranded you seems fresh, relevant, and  perfect for position they have open.

Who is a candidate for rebranding?

Unless you have an iron-clad

. . .read more
Updated June 19, 2017 |
What's the Difference Between a Letter of Interest and a Cover Letter?
Letters of interest and cover letters are frequently used interchangeably even though they have different purposes.
Depending on the instructions you read on a private school's employment page, you may be directed to send a letter of interest or a cover letter. Some people think that a letter of interest is the same as a cover letter. But they really are not the same. What then exactly is the difference between these two letters and how do you compose them?
 
What is a letter of interest?
 
Strictly speaking, you compose and send a letter of interest when a prospective employer requests that you do so. In the sense that a letter of interest is a letter written to accompany your resume and other required documentation it functions almost the same as a cover letter. But there is a major difference. The letter of interest is written to give a snapshot of you and what makes you worth interviewing.
 
Remember the mechanics involved here. A staff member is charged with reading all those applications which have been submitted for the advertised position. Depending on circumstances there could be dozens of applications to review. The school wants the best candidate for the vacant position after all. So, there sits the member of staff who has to open all the envelopes and review them. Is he going to have time to read each one in detail? Probably not. But he will scan that letter of interest which you have written looking for a couple of features which set you apart from the other applicants.
 
One of the goals of the letter of
. . .read more
Updated August 05, 2016 |
Are You the Right Person for Our Job?
For starters we won't know unless you present your application in the format and in the manner we specify.

In this article, I will assume the role of the school which is advertising a position. I want you to see and understand what goes on behind the scenes as applications come in online, via email or snail mail.  With that knowledge, I know that you will take the extra time and care necessary to submit the kind of application which will make the first cut. After all, you need to make it to the interview stage. Otherwise, all bets are off. I will present the school and its thinking. I will follow that with my editorial comments and advice.

The School: When we advertise a position, we expect to receive hundreds of applications and resumes. Some of these are from people whom we know; however, most of the applications are from people we do not know. Tell me now, why should I look at your resume? Here are some reasons why your application will go onto the "Review" pile.

1. You presented your application in the format which we specified.

School: Following instructions is a trait most employers value. As a result, a simple thing like following the instructions on how to apply for the job opening at our school speaks well of you. We use a standardized application form at our school in order to comply with all sorts of legal requirements. So, if you use something other than the form which we specify, your chances of making the first cut are fairly slim. While some schools will let you

. . .read more
View Pages:<<Prev  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10  Next>>
Recent Articles
September 05, 2017
If you live outside the United States, choosing an American private school can be a confusing process. Here is an overview of the process.
September 05, 2017
Never lose sight of why you are planning to send your child to private school. This list of ten considerations will help you focus on the things which matter.
September 04, 2017
Use this hub to keep track of the steps in the private schools' admission process.
Jobs in Private Schools

Basics

Here you'll find valuable information on finding jobs within the private school sector. Get the basics on everything from job searches to salary and contract negotiations. Explore the dos and don’ts of private school employment and learn your marketability quotient.

Applying and Interviewing

Learn more about applying and interviewing for jobs in a private school. Here we'll cover everything from cover letters to interview questions. Get tips on common application mistakes, how to ask good questions during your interview, and marketing yourself.

Teacher

A glimpse into some of the most important facing teachers today. Learn why it's important to be cautious on Facebook. Get tips on switching to a teaching career later in life. And learn how a teacher can influence students and their families.