Top South Carolina Alternative Private High Schools

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(12)
All Schools
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High Schools
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High Schools
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  • For the 2019-20 school year, there are 8 top alternative private high schools in South Carolina serving 298 students.
  • Alternative schools typically provides a nontraditional education curriculum and falls outside the categories of regular, special education, or vocational education.

Top South Carolina Alternative Private High Schools (2019-20)

  • School Location Grades Students
  • Amikids Georgetown
    All-boys | Alternative School
    1590 E CCC Rd
    Georgetown, SC 29440
    (843)546-5478

    Grades: 7-10 | 38 students
  • Cherokee Creek Boys School
    Cherokee Creek Boys School Photo - Cherokee Creek Lodge
    All-boys | Alternative School
    198 Cooper Road
    Westminster, SC 29693
    (864)710-8183

    Grades: 5-10 | n/a students
  • Compton Academy
    Alternative School
    218 Rockmont Dr
    Fort Mill, SC 29708
    (803)396-8078

    Grades: 10-12 | 8 students
  • First Assembly Christian School
    Alternative School (Assembly of God)
    1176 Calhoun Rd
    Saint Matthews, SC 29135
    (803)655-7349

    Grades: 9-12 | 9 students
  • Foundation Christian School
    Foundation Christian School Photo
    Alternative School (Christian)
    1605 Old State Rd
    Gaston, SC 29053
    (803)794-9544

    Grades: NS-12 | 29 students
  • Harvest Time International Academy
    Alternative School (Christian)
    227 Huger St
    Charleston, SC 29403

    Grades: 7-9 | 3 students
  • New Hope Carolinas
    Alternative School
    101 Sedgewood Dr
    Rock Hill, SC 29732
    (803)328-9300

    Grades: 6-12 | 148 students
  • 690 Coleman Blvd.
    Mount Pleasant, SC 29464
    (843)884-0902

    Grades: 3-12 | 63 students
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