Basics

Here you'll find valuable information on finding jobs within the private school sector. Get the basics on everything from job searches to salary and contract negotiations. Explore the dos and don’ts of private school employment and learn your marketability quotient.
View the most popular articles in Basics:
Updated June 25, 2014 |
The Pros and Cons of Teaching Overseas
Hundreds of private schools, and for that matter, public schools, outside the United States will be happy to have you as a teacher for a few years.
Hundreds of private schools, and for that matter, public schools, outside the United States will be happy to have you as a teacher for a few years. It's a great opportunity for teachers of any age who want to experience the world. And, because they need trained teachers, the local authorities will take care of all the immigration matters for you as part of the contract.
 
At the end of this article you will find links which will help you find jobs overseas. But before you explore those, what's it really like teaching abroad?

1. You won't get rich.
You knew that anyway. But be prepared for the reality that teachers don't make a lot of money overseas. Depending on the job location, you may get housing included. Most likely you will have to find housing yourself. You definitely will not have a lot of money for luxuries. Just the bare necessities. If you are not frugal or don't want to learn how to be frugal, you need to confront that issue before you sign up. Otherwise you will be miserable.

2. Be open minded.
Bulgaria is not the United States. and that, frankly, is part of its charm. You won't find the foods which you are accustomed to. They do things differently over there. That's the point. Try new things. Experiment. It's an adventure.

3. Third world countries do not have first world amenities.
The electricity may not be reliable. Cellphone service is usually fairly good
. . .read more
Updated June 10, 2016 |
Is Your Network Keeping You Connected?
A private school teacher has to create her own ways of staying connected. Staying connected keeps you informed and gives you a sense of solidarity.
Private school teachers do not belong to a teachers' union. One of the great strengths of a union is that it connects like-minded workers, keeps them informed of trends within their industry and promotes solidarity. These are all laudable aims. How does a private school teacher achieve all that?
 
Keep your network current
Think of all the people you meet in person or electronically every day. Keep email addresses for those colleagues and others whom you consider valuable in some way. Perhaps you admire a colleague for her leadership in a particular area such as laptop computing  or Web 2.0. Leave a comment on her blog. Email her. You don't have to write an epistle. A few words of positive support and encouragement are all that is needed. Ask for help. It is impossible for anybody to have all the answers. Your colleagues are a wonderful resource. Keeping your network current allows you to utilize those resources fully.

Connect on ISED-L and ISEN
Interacting with your colleagues is something you need to do regularly. Join the discussions on ISED-L and ISEN. Express your opinions. Learn from what others are saying.
 
Blog
Blogging is one of the most effective ways for you to stay connected. Blogging is free. It's easy to do. Think of blogging as an electronic journal. Jot down your thoughts. No need to fuss about syntax or grammar. Blogging is free-form. Read other blogs. Leave comments for those bloggers. Create your own blog in a private school community such
. . .read more
Updated June 10, 2016 |
Employing Foreign Nationals
Can non-U.S. teachers get employment in American private schools? The answer is "No" in 99.9% of cases.
This article is written for the benefit of the hundreds of foreign nationals who seek employment in American private schools each year. Be aware that most American private schools will hire a foreign national only if he or she has a Green Card. The Green Card or Permanent Resident Card (also known as Form I-551) gives its holder permission to work in the U.S. Without it or American citizenship you cannot work in the U.S. So the answer to the question "Can foreign nationals get teaching jobs in U.S. private schools?" is "No!" with only a few minor exceptions.
 
Why won't a school sponsor your application for a Green Card? Because it is too much of gamble. The school goes through all the hassle and expense of securing a Green Card for you only to have you decide a few years later that you want to work in another school. It's just not worth it.

A few private schools will go to the bother of securing a Permanent Resident Card for a key staff member such as a head of school. But those instances are few and far between. The situation is very much a 'catch 22' as the American Embassy in your home country will tell you that you need a job before you can apply for a work visa. On the other hand the school will tell you that it needs you to have a green card before it will consider you for employment.
 
The very few exceptions
. . .read more
Updated May 25, 2016 |
What Do Teachers Make?
What do teachers make? Teachers' salaries vary from state to state, indeed, from school to school.
What does a teacher make? "Not nearly enough" is the almost universal answer. Scan a site like Salary.com and check out competing jobs. You will see that the problem with teaching is that we demand highly qualified, well-credentialed individuals with experience to take jobs for which we literally pay them less than a dog catcher.
 
The cynics will say that teachers are well-compensated for what they do. After all, they get all those holidays. And they only work for ten months anyway. The reality is that teachers invest inordinate amounts of time preparing lesson plans, learning new techniques, keeping certifications current and so on. And then there is the cost of that bachelor's degree, the masters and doctorate. Let's face it, the ROI is job satisfaction, not financial reward.
 
Private school teachers are more fortunate than most public school teachers. Why? Because they get to teach their subject to small classes. Real learning takes place in most private school class rooms as a result of low student to teacher ratios. Discipline is rarely a problem. What does this have to do with teacher compensation? Combine job satisfaction with a reasonable compensation package and you will have a happy teacher.
 
Private school teachers enjoy many perks which are not generally found in the public sector. These include free or reduced tuition for faculty children, meals and housing at boarding schools.
Updated February 06, 2017 |
How to Find a Private School Job
You can send in a resume and use an agency, but the very best way to find a private school job is to use your network. You do have a network, don't you?
You can send in a resume and use an agency to find a private school job. But the very best way to find a private school job is to use your network. You do have a network, don't you?
 
In truth, the private school job hunting season never ceases. The main window of opportunity is from December through March. Not much happens on either side of those months unless a school has an unexpected vacancy.This is where your network comes in. Let's say that you are thinking about finding a new position for the next school year. You should try to firm up that decision by the end of October or November so that you can begin your active job search.
 
First Steps
 
Check the job boards in the areas you are thinking about moving to. Register with an agency which specializes in placing private school teachers. They will know about openings. That will get you thinking about the possibilities.
 
Know why you want to make a move. Are you making a lateral move, i.e., moving to another school to do the same thing as you have been doing. Or are you thinking about different responsibilities such as being an administrator? It is very important for you to have your goals clearly understood. That will be invaluable during the interview process when the inevitable question "Why do you want to leave St. Swithin's and come teach at our school?" is asked. 

This brief video offers three tips to advance your career
. . .read more
View Pages:<<Prev  1 2 3 4  Next>>
Recent Articles
May 15, 2017
Many famous children have attended private schools. Here is a sampling of schools and the famous folk who graced their hallowed halls.
May 11, 2017
As you narrow the field in your private school search process, you will develop a short list of three to five schools which you will evaluate in detail. Visiting each school is an essential part of your due diligence.
May 11, 2017
Learn more about the Private School Review "Ultimate Admissions Checklist," with top-flight tips from leading minds in education.
Jobs in Private Schools

BASICS