How to Find a Private School Job

Updated August 01, 2017 |
How to Find a Private School Job
You can send in a resume and use an agency, but the very best way to find a private school job is to use your network. You do have a network, don't you?
You can send in a resume and use an agency to find a private school job. But the very best way to find a private school job is to use your network. You do have a network, don't you?
 
In truth, the private school job hunting season never ceases. The main window of opportunity is from December through March. Not much happens on either side of those months unless a school has an unexpected vacancy.This is where your network comes in. Let's say that you are thinking about finding a new position for the next school year. You should try to firm up that decision by the end of October or November so that you can begin your active job search.
 
First Steps
 
Check the job boards in the areas you are thinking about moving to. Register with an agency which specializes in placing private school teachers. They will know about openings. That will get you thinking about the possibilities.
 
Know why you want to make a move. Are you making a lateral move, i.e., moving to another school to do the same thing as you have been doing. Or are you thinking about different responsibilities such as being an administrator? It is very important for you to have your goals clearly understood. That will be invaluable during the interview process when the inevitable question "Why do you want to leave St. Swithin's and come teach at our school?" is asked. 

This brief video offers three tips to advance your career
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Updated July 03, 2018 |
Paying for Private School
Some people can write a check for a year's tuition and never miss it. The rest of us have to be creative. Here are some options for paying for a private school education.
Some people can write a check for a year's tuition and never miss it. But with private school tuitions running into the $30's for day school and getting close to $50,000 for boarding school, the rest of us have to be creative.
 
Here are some options for paying for a private school education.
  • Pay the fees in two installments.
  • Sign up with a tuition payment service and pay monthly installments.
  • Borrow the funds you need.
  • Apply for financial aid.
  • Investigate other funding sources.
Pay the fees in two instalments.
Private schools generally render their bills in early summer and late fall for payment within 30 days. These invoices will include one half of the academic year's tuition charge as well as incidentals. Incidentals include fees for items such as as technology, sports, activities, laundry, and so on. Be sure to ask whether the school offers a cash discount.
 
Sign up with a tuition payment service and pay monthly installments.

The way these plans work is that you in effect are borrowing from them.  You borrow one year's tuition fees and incidentals. Then you repay in equal installments, generally 10 installments. The plan in turn pays the school on the tuition due dates. This is a good payment option if you need to spread the payments over several months.
 
Note: not all schools accept all these plans. Each school makes its own arrangements with a specific tuition payment service. These firms offer private school tuition payment plans:
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Updated May 25, 2016 |
Open Houses
You must visit schools on your short list. Open houses are an efficient way to do this. More on organizing this task here.
Visiting schools is a critical part of choosing a school. Yes, you can get a pretty good idea of school programs and facilities from a web site. But remember that the school is presenting itself exactly as it wishes to be seen in a highly edited and sanitized manner.
 
Accordingly, you simply must see the school, inspect the facilities, meet some students and chat with the staff. After all, you are thinking about entrusting your precious child to these people. You must determine if they are a good fit for your child. Your child won't be just a number in a private school. Small class sizes and a low student to teacher ratio mean that she won't get lost in the shuffle. Consequently she needs to be in a setting which will nurture and bring out the best in her. Your practised eye can root out any potential problems. Use a Checklist for Comparing Schools to keep track of your observations and answers to your questions.
 
Remember: a school doesn't shape just educational outcomes; it also strongly influences attitudes and critical thinking. The culture of a school has a lot to do with this. Visiting the school allows you to evaluate all these important aspects.
 
Many schools have open houses. These offer you a wonderful opportunity to visit the school, see classrooms, listen to the school's 'story' and meet admissions staff. How do you figure out which schools have open houses in your area? You can look on the
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Updated May 25, 2016 |
How Do I Apply?
You can apply online or submit a paper application via snail mail.
Most private high schools have application deadlines of January or February. If you are applying to several schools, make sure you are on top of each school's specific deadlines. Use our Application Calendar to keep you organized. The application process varies from school to school.
 
Application Options
 
Generally you have three options for applying to private schools:
  • Online at the school's web site
  • Online at the SSAT site 
  • Complete and submit a paper application 
Let's look at how each application option works.
 
Applying Via Individual School Web Sites
 
Not all schools offer an online application feature. But for those schools which have the resources to offer it, you will find the process is straightforward and generally intuitive. Woodberry Forest's is typical. You complete the application, pay for it with a credit card and even download teacher recommendation forms online. How convenient is that? Finally, you can check back as often as you like and see what the status of your application is too.
 
 
SSAT's Online Service
 
The SSAT's School Application Service allows you to apply to several schools using the same information. It's as close
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Updated July 30, 2016 |
What's a Private School?
Private K-12 schools are non-public schools. In other words, they are not part of the public K-12 education system. A brief history of K-12 education in the 17th and 18th centuries and more.

Private K-12 schools are non-public schools. In other words, they are not part of the public K-12 education system.  While private schools are regulated in the same way most businesses are with respect to safety, zoning and registration, they are not required to do many of the things public schools must do such as state testing and accepting any student who applies.

First, let's take a quick look at the history of K-12 education in the United States of America. What were the first colonists were up against as far as education was concerned? The challenges were enormous simply because there was nothing here. The Native Americans did not have school buildings. They educated their offspring in their natural surroundings. The colonists, on the other hand, had left a country with an organized educational system. For example, King's School, Canterbury, opened its doors in 597. In the Middle Ages, the kings and queens of England established schools and universities to educate young men. In most cases, these educational establishments were founded to educate and train clergy, judges, and other public officials. Edward VI set up free grammar schools which were open to all, regardless of religious beliefs or ability to pay. Many of the great cathedrals and abbeys had choir schools where they provided for the education of boys.

Leaving a country with a long history of education, the earliest settlers in America arrived here in the early part of the 17th century, and very quickly and resolutely set about providing

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